Quiet pioneer: the novels of Nan Shepherd

Quiet pioneer: the novels of Nan Shepherd

Quiet pioneer: the novels of Nan Shepherd. Image of Nan Shepherd in headband and plaits.

Quiet pioneer: the novels of Nan Shepherd is in Issue 27 of The Bottle Imp. Out now, its focus is on Scottish women writers of the twentieth-century renaissance:

‘The handmaids, midwives, mothers, mistresses, cooks, nannies, and skivvies to that literary revolution. Oh, and contributors, too. Let’s not forget about their own writing! Again’.

The Unreliable Narrator, Edwin Only Helped.

Nan Shepherd’s novels

Nan Shepherd’s currently best known for her mountain masterpiece, The Living Mountain. In Quiet Pioneer: the novels of Nan Shepherd, Charlotte Peacock shows why Shepherd should be remembered as a key Scottish novelist, too.

Click here to read the article in full.

Women writers of the Scottish literary renaissance

In this edition of The Bottle Imp, you’ll also find Jenni Calder’s examination of Helen Cruickshank: ‘Bide the storm ye canna hinder’.

Magi Gibson’s article on Valda Trevlyn Grieve and the choices she made, in How I Came to Write a Poem about Hugh MacDiarmid’s Socks.

Ajay Close talking about her research into Catherine Carswell, and the difficulties and dangers of fiction and history, in Opening Doors: How I Wrote What We Did in the Dark.

And in Willa Muir: a Shetland Translator in Prague, Michelle Woods looks at how Muir navigated the turbulence of post-war Czechoslovakia, suffered – and recovered from – a fit of the scunners, and gave Kafka to the world.

Summary
Quiet pioneer: the novels of Nan Shepherd by Charlotte Peacock
Article Name
Quiet pioneer: the novels of Nan Shepherd by Charlotte Peacock
Description
Nan Shepherd's best known for The Living Mountain. In Quiet Pioneer: the novels of Nan Shepherd, Charlotte Peacock shows why she should be remembered as a key Scottish novelist, too.
Author
Publisher Name
The Bottle Imp
Publisher Logo
%d bloggers like this: