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The Living Mountain Conversations

The Living Mountain Conversations

Since November of last year, Scottish musician and artist, Jenny Sturgeon, has been in conversation with artists, writers and ecologists about Nan Shepherd’s The Living Mountain. The result is The Living Mountain Conversations, a series of podcasts now available on iTunes and Spotify. Listen in each week as Jenny chats with her guests about Nan …

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Searching for Nan Shepherd

Searching for Nan Shepherd

In the 1970s, Nan Shepherd was introduced to the artist Barbara Balmer. ‘Nan Shepherd’s Sun Porch’ captures the enigmatic writer’s essence.

Nan Shepherd and Jessie Kesson: an uncommon friendship

Nan Shepherd and Jessie Kesson: an uncommon friendship

Nan Shepherd and Jessie Kesson. Theirs was an unlikely friendship. It began by chance and lasted over forty years. It was Shepherd, Kesson credited with kickstarting her writing career. Now that Shepherd’s works are once again in print, it’s timely that Kesson’s have been republished. Read Kesson’s story of when she met the ‘Lady in the Train’.

Nan Shepherd: what shall be your badge?

Nan Shepherd: what shall be your badge?

‘What shall be your badge in the ever-living Wood of Caledon?’ asks Cuthbert Graham in the poem he wrote Nan Shepherd for her 86th birthday. The Scots Pine? Symbol of the untameable mountain? But there is more to Nan Shepherd than her hill book…

Into the Mountain: A Life of Nan Shepherd now in paperback

Into the Mountain: A Life of Nan Shepherd now in paperback

The Shepherd shelf is filling up. Just as the Wild Geese landed, the paperback edition of Into the Mountain appeared. Galileo Publishing has done a beautiful job of both. Read reviews. . This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may earn a small commission if you buy a product after clicking on the …

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Move aside Robert Burns, it’s time to celebrate Scotland’s identity with a woman: Nan Shepherd

Move aside Robert Burns, it’s time to celebrate Scotland’s identity with a woman: Nan Shepherd

‘A strong, confident female voice being celebrated, read and enjoyed at events around the country with predominantly female speakers would be a welcome antidote to the heavily masculine Burns Night with its conspicuous array of male worthies’. Scottish identity can no longer be encompassed in one night nor expressed by one man.

Quiet influence: Nan Shepherd’s lonely uphill struggle

Quiet influence: Nan Shepherd’s lonely uphill struggle

The great celebrator of the Cairngorms has long been overlooked. Charlotte Peacock finally redresses the balance. Fiona Sampson The Spectator View of the Cairngorms National Park in Scotland (image: iStock) The Spectator, 6 January 2018, 9:00 AM ‘It’s a grand thing to get leave to live’, perhaps the most famous line Nan Shepherd wrote, is carved …

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